Students from All Saints CofE Primary School taking part in a tree planting event at Charterhouse, London Road, Coventry CV1 2JR

Blossom Together in Coventry

Blossom Together in Coventry

In October 2023, children from All Saints CofE Primary School and local residents of Charterhouse, planted 20 Blossom trees in Charterhouse Heritage Park for the Blossom Together in Coventry project.

Delivered in partnership by the National Trust and Historic Coventry Trust, and made possible thanks to the funds raised by players of People’s Postcode Lottery, the project aimed to create a small, meaningful place where the local community could connect with nature and enjoy the seasonal delights of blossoming trees.

A small natural play space has also been added for families and children to relax, reflect, play and connect throughout the year.

The work supports the National Trust’s ambition to give communities more access to nature through the creation of green spaces and planting blossom trees, especially in cities where access to nature may be more limited.

With the involvement of local schools and residents being at the heart of this project, the hope is that a lasting legacy will be created that will benefit both wildlife and the local community.

Download more information about the project.

Students from All Saints CofE Primary School taking part in a tree planting event at Charterhouse, London Road, Coventry CV1 2JR

Names and dedications

Many of the children and residents name the blossom trees they helped to plant, or dedicated them  to lost loved ones.

National Trust tree planting event at The Charerhouse in Coventry 28th October 2023. Picture by Shaun Fellows / Shine Pix Ltd

About the Blossom Trees

Four types of blossom tree have been planted in the natural play space. Each tree that was around five years old, meaning they were established and hardy enough to survive the winter outside. Each tree has also been planted with a small pipe at its base to help deliver water closer to the root ball. Coventry-based company Beechwood Trees were on hand to help with the planting and provided mulch, stakes and braces to support the trees after their installation.

Cornus Mas

The Cornelian Cherry produces small yellow flowers in February. It produces bright red, cherry like fruits which are edible. In the autumn, the leaves turn reddish-purple. It has an interesting bark and is good for bees. It was introduced in England in the late 1890s and is native to central and southern Europe. Download more information.

Prunus AviumPrunus Avium

This wild cherry species produces double white flowers in April/May. By autumn, its leaves turn bronze and fiery colours. It has interesting bark and is good for bees. The species has been cultivated since the 1700s in the UK but is not a native species. Download more information.

Prunus Cerasifera NigraPrunus Cerasifera ‘Nigra’

A cherry plum that grows single pink flowers in early spring with the petals fading as small, dark purple leaves grow around them. In autumn the leaves turn red with small plums fruits sometimes being produced, although these are not for human consumption. It was introduced to England in the early 1900s and was commonly planted as a street tree in Britain after WW2. Download more information.

Pyrus Calleryana ChanticleerPyrus Calleryana Chanticleer

This ornamental pears blooms with white flowers in April/May. Its leaves arrive in early spring and turn a bright orangery-red, before falling in late autumn. Occasionally, it may produce small fruits, but these are not for human consumption. The species was bred by Edward Scanlon in the USA and is tolerant of pollution and is often planted in urban areas. Download more information.

Students from All Saints CofE Primary School taking part in a tree planting event at Charterhouse, London Road, Coventry CV1 2JR

Top tree tips

Would you like to plant a tree but wondering where to start? Or do you simply need a few tips on caring for your trees?
Take a look at this video from the National Trust for top tree tips.